This website uses cookies to store information on your computer. Some of these cookies are used for visitor analysis, others are essential to making our site function properly and improve the user experience. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Click Accept to consent and dismiss this message or Deny to leave this website. Read our Privacy Statement for more.
DavidGalbraithBio
David Galbraith

David Galbraith

Secretary (2016-2020)

galbrait@email.arizona.edu

Dr. Galbraith is a Professor in the University of Arizona School of Plant Sciences, and is a member of the Bio5 Institute, the Arizona Cancer Center. He has an adjunct membership in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, and is an Associate of the Institute for the Environment. He was recently appointed Honorary Dean of the School of Life Sciences at Henan University, Kaifeng, China. He was trained at Cambridge University, and held a NATO postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford University. His first academic appointment was at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Dr. Galbraith's research interests include biological instrumentation, developmental, tissue and cell-specific gene expression in eukaryotes, functional genomics and proteomics, and issues in biodiversity. He was elected a Fellow of the American Association for Advancement of Science in 2002, and served as Specialty Chief Editor of Frontiers in Genomic Assay Technology from 2011-2017. He is also an Associate Editor for Cytometry Part A, and was a founding Associate Editor for Plant Methods. He was elected ISAC Secretary in 2016. He is recognized internationally as a pioneer in flow cytometry and sorting as applied to plants.

Specific recent projects with plants include classification of the different cell types found within plant organs and analysis of the molecular mechanisms underlying grape bud dormancy. On the animal side, projects have involved exploration of early events in gene expression during prostate and pancreatic oncogenesis, and the development of hand-held devices to track plant and human pathogens.